Change and continuity - Artist Connie Ah See, Wiradjuri

A Shared History

 Teaching ideas> Stage 2> Change and Continuity

Outcomes


Significant Events
and People
CCS2.1
Describes events and actions related to the British colonisation of Australia and assesses changes and consequences
Time and Change CCS2.2
Explains changes in the community and family life and evaluates the effects of these on different individuals, groups and environments.

Subject matter


the voyage of James Cook in relation to colonisation and world exploration at the time
the establishment of a British colony - aspects of life, significant people including Arthur Phillip, achievements, events and places
Aboriginal resistance to the establishment of a British colony - significant people including Pemulwuy, achievements, events and places
changes to people and places in the Sydney region as a result of British colonisation

the contribution of people and groups from other countries to Australian heritage
the contribution of people and associated places and events to community heritage, including knowledge of original Aboriginal nations and boundaries
differing viewpoints on community heritage
causes and effects of change in the local community and other communities
continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community
family, school, local, national and global events and issues.

Teaching ideas and resources


Activities Indicators

Resistance

The 19th century is a time of monumental change for all peoples in Australia. From the European point of view the achievement was the establishment of the colony and its growth into a modern European nation. From an Aboriginal point of view it was a time of great loss.

Using a variety of texts research either one significant Aboriginal person, an Aboriginal organisation or massacre site. (note cultural sensitivity is essential)
Students present their findings as a poster. Include images, maps and timelines in the presentations.

1. Significant Aboriginal people

19th Century 20th Century
Pemulwuy
Windradyne
Calyute
Yagan
Weeip
Dundalli
Jundamurra
Brian Boru
Boney (Bonaparte)
Blucher
Pompey
Musquito
Jack Patten
William Ferguson
Pearl Gibbs
Pastor Doug Nicholls
Margaret Tucker
William Cooper
Charles (Chicka) Dixon
Gary Foley
Mac Silva
Bruce McGuinness
Guboo Ted Thomas
John Newfong
Mum Shirl
Charles Perkins
Ann Curthoy
Vincent Lingiari

2. 20th century Organisations

Aborigines Advancement League
Australian Aborigines Progressive Association, (AAPA)
Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC)

3. Known massacre sites.

1834 Battle of Pinjarra
1838 Slaughterhouse Creek Massacre
1838 The Myall Creek Massacre
1839 Murdering Gully Massacre
1868 Jaburrara Massacre
1857 The Hornet Bank Massacre
1861 The Cullin-la-ringo Massacre
1886 The Coppermine Murders
1926 Forrest River Massacre
1940 Fighting Hills Massacre

Conduct the role play: The effects of the invasion on the Aboriginal peoples with emphasis on the nations of the Sydney area.

Use the resistance resource sheet to develop critical literacy skills about different attitudes, values and beliefs about the British colonisation.

CCS 2.1
Distinguish different perspectives on the British colonisation of Australia.
Locates and describes different events on a timeline.
Considers and explains how people would have felt, and still do, about the British Colonisation.


Aboriginal nations

Use maps to locate Aboriginal nations to plot the locations of each of the early European settlements:

Sydney
Hawkesbury Valley
Parramatta
Botany Bay
Newcastle
Port Macquarie
Van Dieman's Land (Tasmania)
Moreton Bay

CCS 2.1
Locates and decribes different places, using Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal maps.

A point of view

Aboriginal peoples have a different system of law to European. In Sydney during the early 1800s you witness some invaders whipping some of their own; others you notice are chained together; some have been put out on islands in the harbour; and, others are kept in rooms with locks.

Explain some important differences between between Aboriginal law and non-Aboriginal law in the early 1800s. A short overview of traditional Aboriginal social control is provided. Students research convict social controls.

Based on research compare and contrast the two systems of social controls.

CCS 2.1
Develops an understanding that sources vary.
Explains some of the changes that have happened over time.

Past and Present

Discuss the views recorded by colonists and explorers in relation to Aboriginal peoples. Consider why they might have held these views and why these views were the ones that were written down. Discuss the lack of references to Aboriginal peoples in the sources and its implications.

CCS 2.2
Considers how people would have felt, and still do, about the British Colonisation.

A point of view

Aboriginal peoples have a different system of law to European.

Imagine you are an Aboriginal person in Sydney during the early 1800s. You witness some invaders whipping some of their own; others you notice are chained together; some have been put out on islands in the harbour; and, others are kept in rooms with locks.

Students find evidence of different forms of convict punishment. Write a story about how strange this system of punishment seems from a different perspective.

SSS 2.8
Demonstrates an understanding of the problems of knowledge and perspectives.
Explains how rules are different between cultures and over time.

NSW Department of Education and Training
NEALS
Curriculum K-12